The Real Tory Party and Its Relationship With the Voters of the UK

European Commission; trade agreements; environmental impact; employment rights; democracy, General Election

It’s been an interesting week politically, the noise from the European Continent has quietened down as the French have chosen their President and the Eurocrats have settled back into their bottles of cognac and expensive wines.   In the UK Theresa May has finally decided to “meet” ordinary people on her campaign trail which has been stage managed so far with the only people being the Tory party faithful. This meeting came firstly on an interview she had   with her husband on a BBC show in the early evening, I didn’t watch it as I don’t think the BBC makes any programmes worth watching anymore and its news coverage is so biased it ought to be renamed “the government mouthpiece”. I cannot bring myself to forgive them for nuturing and covering up for known paedophiles in its organisation and, as an organisation, they just make me sick.

Theresa May’s second foray into meeting ordinary people came on the Nick Ferrari show on LBC. It was a good interview and well balanced, and I particularly liked the fact that it was left to the contributing public to put some really hard questions to TM who did her best to duck out of answering them. I have to confess I listened to this up until she was being questioned on the NHS and really couldn’t stomach the blatant lies that woman was saying.

However I took a few insights into this election and the tory party in general from this. Firstly, however much the Tories deride Labour and charge them with wanting to put up taxes after the general election, be absolutely assured this is what the Tories will do and they will do it to ordinary people who cannot carry any more burdens than have already been placed upon them. Secondly, this election is not about wanting a strong mandate for Brexit, it certainly isn’t about wanting a strong and stable leadership, its about keeping the tory party together so they don’t end up like Labour, various factions fighting it out among themselves. This is what she was alluding to when she talked about the country being more united. It’s not the country that’s more united, its the politicians who are more united against the will of the people. Yes, Article 50 has been triggered but that’s only the start, there’s a lot of negotiation to go before we get to the end point and get to see exactly what kind of Brexit we will have.

Will there be the kind of Brexit where we are allowed access to the EEC (the trading part of the EU) and still have to have migration from EU countries which, while the situation with incoming muslims into Europe is an issue, its certainly not something people in the UK would be happy about. Will there be a fudge (which I certainly think there will be) where our negotiatators give up certain ground in order to ensure we maintain some of the things we have become accustomed to having, such as free movement when we go on holidays, being able to buy olive oil, olives, salamis, cheeses, wines, beer and spirits cheaply but continue paying money to them; or will we have the kind of Brexit where TM flounces out of the negotiations, tells the Eurocrats to get stuffed and trade on WTO rules but regain the right to secure our borders, etc., etc..

It seems to me that the whole scenario that we have all been a part and fallen into the trap of, was to keep the Tory party together.

The Labour party has its Blairites, many of whom will either go or lose their seats in any case in this election. There will then be a group of people who will be the Labour party, party of the working people socialist in nature, working for a fairer society which is no bad thing. There will probably be a new party made up of whatever is left of the Blairites who will be Tory lite in the same manner Blair was. The other parties don’t really matter, they are
just there to make up the numbers and certainly don’t pose any threat to the established parties.

The Tory party is just as divided but they are a bit more disciplined in hiding it, but the one thing that has brought them together is the question of whether we are better off inside the EU or outside. There are those on both sides of the argument and these are the ones who will either return or be voted out. Looking at the election from the perspective of the Tory party, it really IS all about Brexit and whether May can get away with sticking 2 fingers up at Brussels and get away with it. What the electorate think really doesn’t matter, we’ll just have to lump it and get on with it. This explains the disdain the Tories have for the electorate and why the really do think voters are an irrelevance except when it comes to asking us to let them continue on their gravy train regardless.

Another interesting nugget of information Theresa May likes to bandy about publicly is her background as a vicar’s daughter, that she is a churchgoer and how her father instilled in her the idea of public service. I realise politicians are hypocrites, but she just keeps spinning like something out of a horror film. She probably is a churchgoer but she is not a Christian. Her father must have instilled in her a hate of public service because she is hellbent on
reducing public services in the UK to rubble. Cameron reduced the fire service so there are more deaths caused by fire now than there were 8 years ago, GP services are being decimated, as are services within the NHS, local government services, care for the elderly and young. People using food banks just to feed themselves is a national scandal that the Tories seem perfectly at ease with. The picture she likes to portray as someone who is strong may be fine for the Tory party who are mostly public school types who probably have fond memories of their nannies when they were children, but for the rest of us she is a cold blooded, heartless, hollowed out shell of an excuse for a human being and I certainly do not see her as fit to hold office, certainly not fit to be re-elected, Brexit or not Brexit.

To summarise: Having established that the Westminster bubble is alive and well in the political party system and the unity Theresa May alluded to in her General Election speech referred to how unified politicians are against the voting public, it is more important than ever that voters appraise their and May’s performance as PM so far and question whether the road she wants to travel down is one we want to join with her. More importantly, we need to convey to the politicians what kind of Britain we want to live in for the longer term, not just the next 5 years.  This needs some deliberate and careful thought and discussion.

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